How much Bathroom? The age old question.

If you’re at a party and you want to start a good ‘ol fashion argument, you can bring up Taxes, religion, states rights or the difference between a 1/2 a 3/4 or a full bathroom.

For every person you ask, you will get a different answer. Everything from, a toilet and a sink is a 1/2 bath. A toilet/sink is a powder room. A toilet/sink/shower is a 3/4 bath. Yudda, yudda , yudda.

Here is what I’ve come up with….

By code, you can not have a toilet without a sink. they go together like peanut butter and jelly.

But you can have a sink by itself.

1e9e60ad6e12  powder room?

New half marble bath (2) imagesfghj   A toilet-sink is a  1/4 bath?

fixture-b2 ????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????   A toilet-sink-tub is 1/2 bath.

bath3    Unknown    outstanding-really-small-bathroom-ideas-with-modern-white-toilet-light-brown-tile-floor-with-white-modern-vessel-sink-unique-wall-light-glass-door-shower

A toilet-sink-shower a 1/2 bath.

These two may be confusing. but if you think about it, you can take only a bath OR a shower.

large     images     bathroom-inspiration-elegant-white-porcelain-pedestal-sink-also-nice-white-toilet-and-tub-as-well-as-single-white-window-frame-glass-in-half-bathroom-ideas-with-wood-floor-design-thrifty-half-bathroo

A toilet-sink-tub/shower combination is a 3/4 bath.

With this you can take a shower and a bath. Depending on how dirty you are.

However that still does not do justice to the toilet-sink-tub and a separate shower. Now that sounds like a full bath!

Small-Bathroom-Shower-Remodel-Ideas          Small-Bathroom-Remodel-Ideas         retro-brown-eye-architects

Of course, this is still just a working theory and does not take into consideration the bidet or the advent of the home urinal.

 

GFCI what’s it all about

A ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) or Residual Current Device (RCD) is a device that shuts off an electric circuit when it detects that current is flowing along an unintended path, possibly through water or through a person. It is used to reduce the risk of electric shock. It works by measuring the current leaving the hot side of the power source and comparing it to the current returning to the neutral side. If they are not equal, this means that some of the current is flowing along an unintended path, and the GFCI shuts the power off. When the problem is corrected, the GFCI can manually be reset by pushing the reset button. There is also a test button that can be used to verify that the GFCI works. It is recommended to test GFCIs at least once a month. GFCIs are required in kitchens, bathrooms, unfinished basements, garages, outdoors, and anywhere near a sink. GFCIs are available in two types for permanent installation, the circuit breaker type that installs in the panel, and the receptacle type that installs in a normal electrical box. GFCIs that attach to appliance cords are also available. These are often found on hair dryers. Although GFCIs are designed primarily to protect from electric shock, they can also prevent some fires, in particular fires that result from a live wire touching metal conduit.

 

GFCIs can be used to upgrade older two-prong (non-grounded) outlets to three-prong (grounded) outlets without installing any new wire. This is safer than using the two-to-three prong adapter, as the adapter may not connect the appliance to ground at all. The GFCI is installed in the electrical box without connecting the ground screw (as there is no ground wire). A label that says “No Equipment Ground” must be placed on the GFCI outlet and all downstream outlets. Several of these labels are usually included with the GFCI.

 

To the POINT

I’ve been collecting images of pencil sharpeners that I have come across in the houses during inspection.

We had one in my parents home.  As a matter of fact  –  it is still there.

My dad built the house in 1968. I can still remember when he screwed it to the side of the shelf in the sign shop. lots of pencils.

I think they give a home good karma.

hgfds    oiu    asfd    trew

 

Then I came across this cool blog…… nice to see others have taken notice.

The Pencil Sharpener
October 17th, 2012
Pencil Sharpener
I find wall-mounted pencil sharpeners, like the kind I remember seeing in elementary school, in many houses. They are often in the basement stairs, but sometimes they show up in bedroom closets too. It’s a fun game that I like to play when showing homes – find the pencil sharpener!

Why did so many people have a commercial grade pencil sharpener? I don’t understand. Do you have one in your house right now? Did you have one growing up? And if you did have one, why? Were you really that serious about homework? Did you run an illegal standardized testing center? How many pencils need to sharpened?

Pencil-Sharpener

I just don’t get it…

This entry was posted on Wednesday, October 17th, 2012 at 9:53 am and is filed under Fun. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.
Karma said at October 17th, 2012 at 10:01 am
Had one growing up and wish I had one now. If you see any lying around let me know, will you? Ha.

Jody said at October 17th, 2012 at 10:13 am
Always love seeing these when I show houses – you know it’s got good bones and is a decent house when there is a tried and true pencil sharpener still standing. It’s usually on basement staircase – I agree.

Tom said at October 17th, 2012 at 10:20 am
We had one growing up. Top of the basement/side entrance stairs, next to the wall of coat hooks. Six kids = lots of pencils to sharpen.

Brooks said at October 17th, 2012 at 11:01 am
We had one growing up that had a suction base. You would bring it out from the cabinet, then flip this little lever and it would stay stuck to the counter while you sharpened.

When we bought our house, I ordered one for the basement. It is semi-permanately mounted on the work bench. It is a requirement for all modest DIYers. also, very useful for crayon sharpening. 🙂

Hardly said at October 17th, 2012 at 2:50 pm
Kyle, when I was a kid in the 60’s and early 70’s we could not use pens in school or for homework(a computer was some huge thing that NASA had) and so we had lots of pencils to sharpen. Further, nobody had an electric pencil sharpener (though I imagine they were around). So we all had pencil sharpeners that looked like this.

Jim said at October 22nd, 2012 at 7:29 am
We had one in our Pantry. It was used all the time in our house because we made so many mistakes on our homework. i want one for my house because all the hand held sharpeners.

Jen said at October 22nd, 2012 at 6:19 pm
We had one when I was a kid in the pantry, too. And yeah, I wish I had one now–the little handheld guys are pathetic compared to the wall-mounted machine.

Brooks said at October 23rd, 2012 at 10:20 am
Jen, you can still get the old school ones very easily on Amazon, or at your local office supply place. I got mine from Amazon, it works great.

 

 

 

PASS or FAIL ?

west-milton-houses-buy-ohio-homes-with-no-money-down_300                          abandoned-mansion-france1

Here is a valid question  I am frequently asked:

“Do you think this house will pass the inspection?  We hope it doesn’t fail.”

That gives me the chance to explain that a home inspection is not a win/loose – pass/fail, situation.

My job is to gather information about the property in question.

Knowledge is power.

A good inspection will give the buyer and the lender, a good, complete image of the property.

I am a non biased third party.

It will be up to the buyer to decide if they want to move forward or walk away.

 

No house is perfect, except maybe this one:   annabella-house-slider

 

An issue that is a deal breaker for one person, may be not be a big deal to someone else.

For instance:

A house may need to be up-graded from 60 amp electrical panel to 100 amp.

The doctor may not have the time to get involved and look decide to look elsewhere.

……but the young couple? Well, her brother is an electrician. No biggie.

This multi-million dollar spread has grass growing in the Foyer……. 20120717-120835

This one comes with a piano…… aband-1

This little place is in a sub-par school district…….. 254_902138.

These two are right on the beach……….House-on-the-beach-Tampa-Bay        desert06

These folks just closed on their dream house:   the-first-6-things-every-lottery-winner-should-do  tumblr_le3zpa3ggh1qzf08jo1_400

They plan to level it and build a parking lot for their airport.

Ground Fault Circuit interrupter! !!

2015-01-22-11-29-58-1303943182015-01-22-11-30-06--958236841images-1  Ground Fault Circuit interrupter!

 

We’ve all seen these fancy outlets in bathrooms and kitchens. Well they’re not just over priced outlets for the guy who has everything. They are an essential safety system to protect against electrical shock.

GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter) receptacles should be installed in bathrooms, kitchens, laundry areas, garages and on the exterior of a house.

A 15 amp GFCI duplex receptacle will cost around $13 for the basic type.

There is no need to have a degree in rocket surgery to install one. However, you never know what you’ll find when you open a receptacle box. Always consider hiring a qualified electrician for any electrical issue.

 

A ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) or Residual Current Device (RCD) is a device that shuts off an electric circuit when it detects that current is flowing along an unintended path, possibly through water or through a person. It is used to reduce the risk of electric shock. It works by measuring the current leaving the hot side of the power source and comparing it to the current returning to the neutral side. If they are not equal, this means that some of the current is flowing along an unintended path, and the GFCI shuts the power off. When the problem is corrected, the GFCI can manually be reset by pushing the reset button. There is also a test button that can be used to verify that the GFCI works. It is recommended to test GFCIs at least once a month. GFCIs are required in kitchens, bathrooms, unfinished basements, garages, outdoors, and anywhere near a sink. GFCIs are available in two types for permanent installation, the circuit breaker type that installs in the panel, and the receptacle type that installs in a normal electrical box. GFCIs that attach to appliance cords are also available. These are often found on hair dryers. Although GFCIs are designed primarily to protect from electric shock, they can also prevent some fires, in particular fires that result from a live wire touching metal conduit. GFCIs can be used to upgrade older two-prong (non-grounded) outlets to three-prong (grounded) outlets without installing any new wire. This is safer than using the two-to-three prong adapter, as the adapter may not connect the appliance to ground at all. The GFCI is installed in the electrical box without connecting the ground screw (as there is no ground wire). A label that says “No Equipment Ground” must be placed on the GFCI outlet and all downstream outlets. Several of these labels are usually included with the GFCI.